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The Science of Human Behaviour

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The Behavioural Science Blog in 2010

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The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Fresher than ever.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A helper monkey made this abstract painting, inspired by your stats.

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 10,000 times in 2010. That’s about 24 full 747s.

In 2010, there were 8 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 58 posts. There were 9 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 868kb. That’s about a picture per month.

The busiest day of the year was January 5th with 131 views. The most popular post that day was Unconscious perceptual processes.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were facebook.com, digg.com, itp.nyu.edu, search.conduit.com, and google.co.in.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for behavioural science, heterotypic continuity, behavioral science, behaviour science, and behavioural sciences.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Unconscious perceptual processes February 2009
3 comments

2

Heterotypic Continuity & Comorbidity October 2008

3

How do biases affect decision making in mental health? October 2009

4

Can People who lack Self-Regulation Skills still have Satisfying and Well-functioning Relationships? June 2008

5

Ego Depletion & Executive Functioning October 2007
1 comment

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Written by Martin Glanert

January 2, 2011 at 1:52 pm

Dan Ariely: It’s OK to cheat and steal (sometimes)

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Dan Ariely is a behavioural economist. He studies irrationality and tries to understand why humans act as they do act. In this video he focuses on the role of morality. In some clever studies he looks at why we think that it’s OK to cheat and steal (sometimes).

Written by Martin Glanert

April 5, 2010 at 10:22 am

Dan Fitzgerald about fMRI – Video interview

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This is a Behavioural Science Video Interview with Daniel Fitzgerald about fMRI

fMRI Video Interview #1

  • Introduction
  • What is fMRI?
  • fMRI Research
  • fMRI Method
  • fMRI Signal
  • The Salmon
  • Corrections & Thresholds
  • The Black Box
  • The Press

fMRI Video Interview #2

  • fMRI & Behaviour
  • Understanding Behaviour
  • Getting Started
  • Use of fMRI
  • Future of fMRI
  • Brain Pacemakers

Written by Martin Glanert

February 6, 2010 at 11:59 pm

Behavioural Science Top 5

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Let’s assume for a while that Google shows you what is important. So Google’s Behavioural Science Top 5 could be translated as “The 5 most important websites about Behavioural Science”.

Well let’s take a look at them:

So there are about 10 million hits for that keyword and this page is ranking #3, just behind Wikipedia (no chance to beat them) and the FBI (probably better not to provoke them). This is actually pretty incredible. Thank you Google!

We will do our best to deliver high quality content.

PS: If you wonder: This picture was taken using a proxy – so no faking with the results, but they might look different on your computer, because Google does track you *creepy…I know*.

Written by Martin Glanert

January 20, 2010 at 4:02 pm

Upcoming Blogposts February 2010

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Just a quick post today to let you know what you can expect in the next few weeks. I am very excited about these upcoming posts, as I have only seen some concept versions – and yeah – they did look very promising!

Pamela Smith is writing on an article about power. She is a powerful woman and it’s also her topic of expertise. Thanks Pam – I am really looking forward to reading your article!

Sanne Nauts just called me about an article we have written together (ready to be published – yeah!). But that’s not what you are gonna get to read (however thinking about it…that might also be interesting) – she really knows all about the backlash effect and what women on a job interview should and should not do.

Fred Hasselman is my personal hero of Nonlinear time series analysis & Dynamical modeling. Don’t worry – he says he has come up with an ingenious way to communicate these topics to people with an IQ lower than 150 (world première!).

Hubert de Mey did give the best lecture I have ever had the opportunity to listen to (about why Skinner got it right and Chomsky got it wrong – such a pitty that battle was lost a few decades ago). He is going to write about why it is really really important to have a theory when doing research (and why mapping brain regions to “something” – does not make sense).

I have also been talking to Daniel Fitzgerald about a possible contribution to this blog. I can tell you more about it in a couple of weeks, but it will most probably be a series of short video interviews on fMRI research and technology.

I am really excited that this blog is growing and attracting such high quality writers. However if you are reading this and you are a student (=like me) I would like to tell you this: Don’t be scared – we’re all a big family. Your contribution is just as valuable – so keep it coming!

Your pretty excited

Martin Metzmacher

New Authors – Welcome!

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If you have been at the Radboud University in Nijmegen lately – you might have seen this ad (PDF). The Behavioural Science Blog is looking for new authors. Lots of them!

Writing this blog (together with Christina now for some times) has been one of the most interesting and also rewarding steps I have taken in my academical carrier.

Behavioural Science is often characterized by ground breaking, but very low-level research. Oftentimes it is only a very select group that actually read the article and  often projects get abandoned, because the end goal “scientific article” is so far away.

I also wonder sometimes why we, as scientists, still use this very complicated system of scientific journals. Okay let’s be honest. Peer reviewed journals are very important when it comes to select high quality research – that’s for sure. But what is with all those really good, but not perferct research? And what is about those great ideas that you have, but never act upon?

As we enter the digital age this will all change – communication will be open, instead of closed. Ideas will spread fast, instead of slow and (from my perspective the best improvement) “ordinary” people will have access to scientific data and ideas.

However the language suited for writing for a select group of knowledgable people is different from the style when writing for “normal” people. It’s all about “What does that tell us?”, “WOW” and “Oh yes…I can use this piece of information for doing X!”.

This is what the Behavioural Science Blog is all about – and I think Dan said it best (so I put it in the ad):

Join us in our quest for high-quality and comprehensive articles written for those who want to follow the latest research, but find traditional sources inaccessible.

Change won’t come on its own.

Join it now and get your message out there!

If you want to become a part of this blog just send me an email and tell me a little bit about who you are and what you would like to write about. Videos, pictures, articles – it’s all welcome. The only thing I ask from you is that it comes in a format that makes it comprehensive to a large group of people, not only scientists in the field of behavioural science.

This has been a great journey for me and I enjoyed every bit of it. I hope you will enjoy it, too!


Martin Metzmacher

Written by Martin Glanert

January 12, 2010 at 11:44 am

Treatment Decisions of Mental Health Profesionals

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I am very happy to have found some fellow researchers that have agreed to write one or more guestposts in the Behavioural Science Blog. For a start I (Martin Metzmacher) have invited a collegue of mine, Christina Sommerdyk, to tell something about biases in clinical decision making, especially what role causal interpretation of a disorder plays in treatment decision. Just today I have read the first draft, which already looked pretty promising. Check back next week to find information about why treatment decisions of mental health profesionals are often deeply biased.

Written by Martin Glanert

October 25, 2009 at 11:39 am